• 11-year-old Kevin Believes Every Child Should Daydream in School
    As told to Adriana Ermter​

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    Kevin stands in front of his science class at the Karugira Primary School in Kigali, Rwanda 

    Photos by Terence Babb

    My English and science teacher asked​ me what ​I want to be when I grow up. I never thought about this before. Nobody ever asked me this question before, either. During science class though, my teacher asked us to think about this question.

    Usually, I only think about what I have to do during the day, like how I have to get dressed, make sure I arrive at school on time and to stay out of trouble. I'm 11 years old and I'm in Standard 5. I pay attention in class and I do my homework. My teacher gave us 10 minutes to think and then, write our answer in our notebooks. It didn't take me too long to make my decision. Once everyone was ready, we shared our answers out loud. I felt a little shy about doing this, but my teacher made this into a game where we clapped after each person spoke and it was fun to hear what the other kids were saying, so I did it and it felt good.

    I want to be a teacher.​​​​​​

    If I'm a teacher, I can give my skills to other chil​dren so that they can dream too and become doctors, soldiers, pilots or whatever job they would like to have when they grow up. One girl in my class wants to be the president of Rwanda! My teacher encourages us to think about our future. He says that when you prepare for your future you're building your future. I like this idea. It's good to dream because it helps you to have goals and to reach your goals. Mine are to study hard, to be serious about what I want to do and who I want to become. You have to be positive and have good behaviour because if you think you can't do something you won't do it. Dreaming is like playing.

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    I like the way my teacher teaches me. He plays games, sings songs and dances with us in my English and in my science classes. The games make me laugh a lot. My favourite one is called Doctor Doctor where we pretend to drink dirty water and then get sick with a disease like intestinal worms or diarrhea. Someone in the class always gets to pretend to be the doctor and my classmates and I have to go to them to for help. I've been the doctor before; it's fun. The doctor gives everyone pretend medicine and it helps us get better. Then, we all have to identify ways that we can stay healthy, such as by not drinking the dirty water and by washing our hands after going to the bathroom. We play this game in science class. It teaches us about disease. I like to learn and play the games because they make my mind fresh and ready to learn more in class.

    Science and English are my favourite classes. I like science because it teaches me about anatomy and it helps me take care of my body. I like English because it's an international language. I already know how to speak Kinyarwanda, but now I'm learning how to speak English, too. This will make me become a better teacher when I grow up. My teacher can speak Kinyarwanda, English and he also knows how to speak French.

    When I'm a teacher I will be smart, kind and happy. I will show children how to d​​ream.​

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    Rig​ht To Play's Play for the Advancement of Quality Education (PAQE) programming launched in 2015 in eight countries with financial support from the Government of Canada provided through Global Affairs Canada. In Tanzania, Rwanda and Mozambique, PAQE is further supported by the LEGO Foundation and uses Right To Play's play-based approach to improve learning outcomes for children and youth aged 2 -15 years through a sustainable and replicable child-centered, play-based learning model.  ​


      
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